Put Fundraising Expectations in Your Board Job Description

Put Fundraising Expectations in Your Board Job Description

Perhaps the most common complaint that I hear from fundraisers and executive directors is “my board won’t fundraise.”

On closer examination it almost always comes down to unclear expectations or lack of knowledge — not an outright avoidance of all fundraising activity.  The vast majority of nonprofit board members understand that they need to be a part of the resource development process.  Most just don’t know how to do that unless you, the fundraiser,  tell them, teach them and guide them.

So what’s the easy fix here?  Spell out your organization’s board fundraising expectations from the very beginning of the relationship.  The easiest way to do this is to put your fundraising expectations in your board job description (there’s a sample one in @fundraiserchad’s Free Resource Library).

Obviously not every item on the board job description will be fundraising related, but a few of the listed responsibilities should be.  They should also be specific.  Something like “in collaboration with other directors, assist in the resource development process” is not going to get it done — they know that they need to do something, but they still don’t know exactly what or how.

Here are a few concrete examples of potential fundraising expectations to include in a board job description:

  • Approve fund development goals and plans;
  • Participate in fundraising activities (especially in regard to identification and cultivation of prospective donors);
  • Make introductions to prospective donors (some organizations set a yearly quota on this one, e.g. a minimum of three);
  • Secure their businesses’ contribution to the annual campaign;
  • Attend all organizational sponsored events (include a list of what & when these are);
  • Make a personally significant contribution to the Fund’s annual campaign (some organizations have a minimum that they list in the job description).

Having a board job description, which includes key fundraising expectations, will make a huge difference in finding the right board members for your organization who are motivated and willing to help you take it to the next level.

How to Write 3 Minute Thank You Notes

We all know the importance of a prompt, genuine, hand-written thank you note after a donor visit or other key interaction.  However, getting that thank you note written and in the mail can be a challenge given the other demands on our time.  Here’s a key tip and a simple process to make it easier …

First of all, make sure you always have a stack of thank you notes with you.  Keep a stack in your office, keep a stack in your briefcase, keep a stack in your car, etc.  Also, pre-stuff them in their envelopes with a business card (but don’t seal them), and pre-stamp the envelope.  One of my favorite hacks is to pre-address the envelope before going into my meeting and then leave it on the passenger seat of my car.  It’s the first thing I see after my meeting and it takes just two more minutes to finish the note.

But what do you write in that note?  You want something that’s efficient, but doesn’t make you sound like an insincere robot?  Here’s a simple three sentence formula for foolproof thank you notes:

sentence 1 = what you saw / what happened
sentence 2 = the impact of what you saw on you or your organization
sentence 3 = what you appreciate about the person’s role in what you saw

Let’s take a look at an example that I actually wrote last week:

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Putting these steps into practice will turn writing a thank you note into a three minute process for you.  One minute of prep (pre-stuffing, pre-stamping, pre-addressing) and two minutes of efficient writing.  And those will be three minutes well spent that make quite the impression with your donors and key contacts.  Just think, when was the last time you actually received a hand-written thank you note?


Tired of sending boring, generic thank you notes? Or stale notes with your organization’s logo? Check out @fundraiserchad’s line of thank you notes designed for fundraisers …

Chad loves providing ACTIONABLE fundraising tips to small nonprofits.  He’s building the best FREE fundraising resource library out there.  Want to know when there’s something new?  Then opt in for email updates ... Oh, and he’s known to give away free swag to subscribers … including $100 donations to your cause!
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